Cory Fenn sentencing hearing will resume April 5

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Cory Fenn sentencing hearing will resume April 5's Profile


A man convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend and two of her children in Ajax won’t learn his fate until April 5.

Krissy Pejcinovski was killed in her Ajax home in March 2018, along with her 15-year-old son Roy and 13-year-old daughter Vana. Vana was found with serious injuries and succumbed in hospital.

Court heard that Krissy had been planning to break up with Cory Fenn just hours before the killings.

Fenn appeared in an Oshawa courtroom on Friday.

He was escorted from the courtroom partway through proceedings, after interrupting a family friend of the victims during an impact statement.

Earlier in the morning, there was a heated exchange between him and the judge, during which he went on a violent, expletive-filled tirade.

He argued he should be paid “restitution” for being kept in the prison system during the COVID-19 pandemic. “It’s been a nightmare,” he said to Justice Howard Leibovich. “It’s been a modern-day Holocaust, sir.”

He also took issue with the decision to keep his former lawyer as an amicus of the court, characterizing it as a conspiracy. He went on to say his former lawyer “should be shot and [expletive] killed.”

He was again reprimanded by the judge.

Following a brief recess, court heard victim impact statements from various friends and family members.

“A huge part of me died along with Roy, Vana and Krissy,” wrote Natasha Pejcinovski, the children’s aunt, who was not able to attend. Her statement was thus read out by Gina Patsis-Efstathiadis, a family friend.

“The grief is constant, unwavering, insidious,” she added.

“I will never cheer at their hockey games,” she wrote. “I will never dance at their weddings or tell them how proud I am of them.”

According to Pejcinovski, the murders affected family across five different countries. She opted not to tell her mother, who died two years later, about the murders.

While reading the statement, Patsis-Efstathiadis was interrupted by Fenn.

“Don’t blame me, lady,” he said.

“Guys, I didn’t kill nobody,” he continued. “I was set the [expletive] up.”

This got Fenn thrown out of court. For the rest of the day, he watched proceedings over a video feed.

One of the other statements was written by Victoria Pejcinovski, the family’s surviving child.

“My mother was such a beautiful person, inside and out,” she wrote. She went on to describe her brother Roy as one of the most “kind-hearted and respectful people ever” and her sister Vana as her “best friend.”

“I miss hearing their voices, their laughs, everything,” she said.

Since Fenn was convicted of three counts of second-degree murder, he will receive an automatic life sentence.

The judge will have to decide how long Fenn will wait before he’s eligible for parole.

Prosecutors have been calling for Fenn to serve 72 years in jail before he’s eligible. Of those, 22 years would come from the murder of Krissy, 25 would come from the murder of Roy and the last 25 would come from the murder of Vana.

“The evidence shows that he’ll remain a danger to the community and that he [is] a dangerous man,” said Mike Newell, a Crown prosecutor.

Meantime, Mary Cremer, the amicus of the court, argued Fenn should not have to wait until he is 105 years old before his first parole hearing. She recommended a parole ineligibility period of between 22 and 25 years.

He will be back in court on April 5. Justice Leibovich noted that he may or may not have a decision to announce that day.

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