Focus on things you can control to combat “COVID fatigue”: associate Ontario Tech professor

Focus on things you can control to combat “COVID fatigue”: associate Ontario Tech professor

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Focus on things you can control to combat “COVID fatigue”: associate Ontario Tech professor's Profile


If you’re tired of the pandemic, you’re probably experiencing “COVID fatigue,” but there are ways to fight it.

Associate Professor at Ontario Tech, Dr. Wendy Stanyon, suggests focusing on things you can control in your life, like your own well-being.

“Then we can take care of other people that we may have responsibility for [like] our partners, our children, but if you don’t take care of yourself, you really don’t have the energy or ability to take care of other people,” explained Stanyon.

She recommends assessing the risk the virus poses to you personally from a health position before exploring options to keep yourself busy. Stanyon says many people have been returning to hobbies, getting things done they have been putting off for years, reconnecting with others and spending more time with friends and family.

She adds many people have been inundated with information about the virus and it can be too much, which is when you should consider taking a break and focusing on other things. She also says it’s important to find a balance between being informed and focusing on the pandemic.

Focusing on it too much, especially on the negative aspects, can start to wreak havoc on your mental health, according to Stanyon.

Stanyon says although ‘COVID fatigue’ can affect all age groups, she believes it’s hitting teens the hardest.

“I think it’s probably particularly hard on teenagers who are entering into an area of their life where peers are incredibly important,” said Stanyon. “They often get their identity from their peer group and they’re really very social, so I think it’s very hard for them.”

She says while it’s difficult for adults, they’re able to prioritize more in their life.

Although it can be a tough time for young children, Stanyon points out that they’re likely feeling the way the adults in their lives feel because they take their cues from them. She says young children are resilient and can easily adapt.

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