Ojibway and Métis musician sets off on tour with Tim & The Glory Boys

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Ojibway and Métis musician sets off on tour with Tim & The Glory Boys's Profile


While some music groups culminate their year of hard work at an awards ceremony, Tim & The Glory Boys’ multi-instrumentalist Brenton David was back on the Home-Town Hoedown tour as soon as the Canadian Country Music Awards week came to a close.

It was a big week in Calgary for Tim & The Glory Boys. The band shared the stage with George Canyon during the CCMA Legends Concert and was nominated for Group/Duo of the Year. 

David, who is a member of Sagkeeng First Nation and has Métis roots in Manitoba’s Interlake region, is from Selkirk, Man.

He plays guitar, banjo and fiddle for Tim & The Glory Boys. The instruments that David said “are a little off the beaten path” have been his ticket to a career as a professional musician.

The 31-year-old’s career consists of that time on the road with Tim & The Glory Boys, having joined Tim Neufeld and Colin Trask in the band in 2018. He also has a solo career that began during the pandemic and includes radio hits This House and Talkin Bout You

Trask speaks highly of his friend and bandmate’s musical chops.

“He just has an incredible kind of soulful voice and the stuff he sings about is just so rooted in his heritage in Manitoba,” he said. 

“When he comes out on stage with us, we look way better!”

Winnipeg’s Now Country 104.7 afternoon show host Brian Cook said David’s music has wide appeal.

“His sound on This House and Talkin’ Bout You isn’t just for country music fans,” he said.

“They have a reach that cuts through genre right to the heart.”

Musician Brenton David is a member of Sagkeeng First Nation and has Métis roots in Manitoba’s Interlake region. (Brenton Thorvaldson)

Brenton’s cultural pride plays a role in his musical career, being a music teacher and instilling his love for Métis music through the fiddle.

“I’m always trying to fuse my First Nation and Métis fiddling roots with something more contemporary,” he said.

During public health restrictions, musicians tried creative ways to reach audiences. David said Tim & The Glory Boys’s drive-in concert experience was one of the most challenging. 

“We put so much effort into making sure the technical requirements are right and the sound is right — when someone pulls up in their car listening on AM radio, it’s not quite the same,” he said.

Since restrictions have lifted, David has been back out on the road and back in front of a regular audience.

“This last summer was the first one in two years that felt a lot closer to normal, with bigger crowds, playing country music festivals where there’s 10,000 people and not 500 people sectioned off into crowds.

“Now with things starting to open back up, it feels like a fresh start. It feels like a new golden era of music.”

In the latter half of 2022, the band’s Home-Town Hoedown Tour makes its way through more than 30 stops in the U.S. and Canada, including Winnipeg on Oct. 16, before wrapping up in Thunder Bay, Ont., on Nov. 13.



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